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Entries for July 2015

Dr. Dan Ebener, author of Servant Leadership Models for Your Parish (Paulist, 2010), has been installed as a Fellow of the Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute. Dr. Ebener is a professor of organizational leadership for St. Ambrose University, acts as Director of Stewardship and Parish Planning for the Diocese of Davenport, and provides strategic planning and leadership training for Quad City Leadership Consulting, Inc. in Davenport, IA.  "We are delighted to have Dan explicitly join us in our mission 'to serve God by helping all the members of Christ's body love and lead as Jesus...

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BREAKING BREAD - Archbishop Cyprian Kizito Lwanga shares lunch and conversation with Father Dave Beauvais (to his left), Dick Kunnert (across the table) and priests of the Kampala Archdiocese during a seminar designed to help the priests become more Jesus-like leaders.  By Dick Kunnert Senior Fellow, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute What a week. January 7-13. Father Dave Beauvais and I responded to an invitation to go to Kampala, Uganda, and make a presentation on the S3Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesusto the priests of the Kampala Archdiocese. It was the second time in four mon...

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We all know Jesus told us to “love your neighbor as yourself.” So it shouldn’t be too much to expect Christians to respect everyone they meet. But St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, realized that respect is more than just a matter of the heart. That’s why he instructed his followers not only to respect others, but to show respect for them. “Preserve yourself in peace and true humility of soul, keeping silence when silence should be kept and, when you must speak, speaking with discretion,” he advised. “May your peace and humility show in the modesty of your counte...

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  People who take the time to gratefully reflect on their lives just once a year on Thanksgiving Day are cheating themselves — and scientists are proving it. One of those scientists — but by no means the only one — is Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D, who is author of Thanks! How Practicing Gratitude Can Make You Happier (published earlier in hardcover with the title Thanks! How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier). His research has shown that the old adage, "Count your blessings," is a really powerful prescription for a better life. "Preliminary findings suggest that thos...

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How to benefit from your failures

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Everyone has heard the story of how Thomas Edison regarded failure. Asked how he could keep pursuing invention of a successful light bulb after he had failed again and again, he replied: "I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work." If attitude counts for anything, his attitude about failure is a good one to have. He ended up having 1,093 patents to his name. Mindy Crary, writing in Forbes, offers seven keys for what she calls "successful failure." Reject rejection — Develop a healthy self-image not based on your performance. (Crary doesn't say...

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  Art Markman, a professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, executive editor of the journal Cognitive Science and a member of the editorial board of Cognitive Psychology, says: "Innovative ideas emerge when people are able to apply their knowledge to new problems." He offers five suggestions for how to lead better by leveraging your learning. Stop and organize. After a meeting, take a minute to review the three main things that came up. It will help you retain important matters much better. Give yourself permission to learn new things. Reserve quiet time at least o...

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  According to one of his secretaries, St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, had a four step process for making sound decisions. First, he carefully considered each matter before deciding it. He was not one to rush to judgment. Second, he prayed quite a bit about the decision and opened himself to the wisdom and will of God. Third, he made it a point in every decision to seek out those who were competent in the matter and to listen to them, asking them about the many different factors that might be weighed in the decision. Fourth, when he did not think he had sufficient knowledge to make a sou...

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7 simple ways to motivate others

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Some people argue that no one can motivate another person, but that claim is probably more a matter of semantics than substance. Anyone who can recall working harder for one teacher than others way back in grade school has some sense that one person's behavior can, in fact, inspire greater effort and achievement in others. Recently Vivian Giang, writing for Business Insider, recently suggested seven ways we can motivate others. 1. Introduce yourself on a personal basis. We think it's more accurate to urge leaders to "interact on a personal level," but Giang's point that first impr...

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  Writing in Decision Making, Leadership, Learning, Kevin Eikenberry says raises questions about when a leader should call a meeting to reach a decision. He distinguishes between four kinds of decision-making processes: Independent — the leader makes it alone, so no meeting is required — except, perhaps, to announce the decision. With input — the leader wants input before making the decision, so interaction is important and a meeting to discuss factors may be a good idea. Collaborative — the leader wants more than input, so interaction is crucial and a meeting is a good place for p...

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Sometimes less is more

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  According to a study conducted by Dr. K. Anders Ericcson and published in the Psychological Review, the key to great success is not plugging away 10 or 12 hours a day, but working harder in short bursts of time. Timothy Ferriss probably carried it to an extreme in his New York Times bestseller The 4-Hour Workweek, but 4-hour work days seem to be more productive for famous authors and excellent musicians. Shorter work days seem to play a crucial role when the level of concentration needed to be productive is high and projects require long periods of time to complete — such as writing a novel or learnin...

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