News

Entries for July 2015

  I would rather fix my attention on one fault that I had committed than on all the evil that might be said of me. – St. Ignatius of Loyola A woman, Isabel Roser, once wrote to St. Ignatius because she was troubled by criticism from her neighbors. She and her husband were generous givers. But that prompted their neighbors, driven by envy, to spread lies about them. Ignatius told her not to be troubled. “I am not at all surprised at this, not even if it were worse than it is,” he replied. “For just as soon as you determined to bend every effort to secure the praise, honor and service ...

Read More >

Five tips for keeping good people

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Joel Garfinkle, writing for the SmartBlog on Leadership, says losing good people is usually not the result on underpaying them. Usually the reason they leave is because of “the environment at work.”  The executive coach and author of “Getting Ahead: Three Steps to Take Your Career to the Next Level,” says: “There are many factors that contribute to an undesirable work environment, but they all have one thing in common: It’s the manager who creates the environment who is ultimately responsible for driving employees away.” In a report called ”People don’t...

Read More >

  Dr. Michael Cieslak, a Yeshua Fellow and Director of Research & Planning for the Catholic Diocese of Rockford, has produced a new training video called Foundational Principles of Parish Pastoral Councils. The 42-minute video outlines:   the various purposes of parish pastoral councils; norms they adopt to achieve their purposes; processes they can use to reach recommendations; and, different procedures used to select members for the council. It also discusses common indicators of parish vitality – measures to use in evaluating a parish’s service to its members.  I...

Read More >

  When Bob De Lorenzo left El Tesoro de los Angeles Retreat Center in Woodland Park a year ago, he took with him a passion for helping others learn to be Jesus-like S3 Leaders. He had just spent two days participating in a Catholic Leading Like Jesus Encounter and Facilitator Training, and he was eager to share the experience with others back in his home parish and wherever else he might be needed. A retired nuclear engineer with extensive military and civilian experience, he found that the principles of leading like Jesus happily integrated much of what he knew about his Catholic faith and had learned about lea...

Read More >

  The Catholic vision for leading like Jesus stresses that Jesus-like, selfless S3 leadership inspires great loyalty to mission. In contrast, self-serving leaders inevitably, if inadvertently, encourage their followers to mimic their self-serving behaviors — and then no one is looking after the mission. Jesus’ patient but persistent and visionary leadership helped his apostles grow from naïve, often bumbling and less than loyal followers to people who were willing to give their lives to serve the mission he gave them — to make disciples of all nations. And the power of that leadership is sti...

Read More >

  If you’re interested in leading like Jesus and in helping others to do so too, you may want to download a free a document offered by the Committee on Evangelization and Catechesis of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. Disciples Called to Witness: The New Evangelization is a 31-page PDF file that can assist you in several ways.  It provides brief, but helpful background about the church’s teaching on discipleship and evangelization, from the Gospels, Acts, the Second Vatican Council, and the writings of Popes Paul VI, John Paul II and Benedict XVI.   It describes the r...

Read More >

  "Nothing should be said to lessen the good name of others, or to complain about them," St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, advised his followers. Obviously, he was setting the bar plenty high. And some of us might wonder if we would be doomed to a life of silence if we and all our friends consistently followed this advice. After all, we know that a little complaining can even be therapeutic -- especially if we choose our listeners carefully, confident in their compassion and discretion. But complaining about and disparaging others can also become a habit -- a lens through which we unne...

Read More >

  Chery Gegelman, president of Giana Consulting, tells a story dating back to her first days of trying to make herself at home in a large corporation after working for nonprofits and small businesses. The transition was challenging. She felt very inadequate. But then the CEO of a client firm wrote a note to her regional manager, calling her "a diamond in the rough." Her boss shared the note with her. "What is interesting to me today," she says, "is that the customer who wrote the note was an incredibly successful and busy CEO. In spite of his schedule, he intentionally chose to invest hi...

Read More >

  The latest edition of the prestigious CARA Report highlights research conducted by Dr. Michael Cieslak, a Fellow of the Yeshua Institute, on why people both leave and return to the Catholic Church. Dr. Cieslak's paper, Why People Leave the Catholic Church and Why They Return: Data from the 'Catholics Come Home' Online Survey, was presented at the annual meeting of the Religious Research Association/Society for the Scientific Study of Religion in October, 2011. His research found that many people leave for no specific reason -- they just drift away. And most of those who later return fall into th...

Read More >

From one disciple to another

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Create in me, O God, a pure heart; give me a new and steadfast spirit. Psalm 51:12 By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute This verse, from the readings at Mass on Ash Wednesday, remind us of the paramount consideration in leading, living and loving as S3 Jesus-like leaders. We must constantly strive to align our hearts with Jesus' own -- focusing our lives as he focused his own always and everywhere doing the will of our Father. This is a journey of a lifetime. We can always do better. The Paulist Press Ordo says "the purpose of the first part of...

Read More >

Dr. Dan Ebener, author of Servant Leadership Models for Your Parish (Paulist, 2010), has been installed as a Fellow of the Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute. Dr. Ebener is a professor of organizational leadership for St. Ambrose University, acts as Director of Stewardship and Parish Planning for the Diocese of Davenport, and provides strategic planning and leadership training for Quad City Leadership Consulting, Inc. in Davenport, IA.  "We are delighted to have Dan explicitly join us in our mission 'to serve God by helping all the members of Christ's body love and lead as Jesus...

Read More >

BREAKING BREAD - Archbishop Cyprian Kizito Lwanga shares lunch and conversation with Father Dave Beauvais (to his left), Dick Kunnert (across the table) and priests of the Kampala Archdiocese during a seminar designed to help the priests become more Jesus-like leaders.  By Dick Kunnert Senior Fellow, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute What a week. January 7-13. Father Dave Beauvais and I responded to an invitation to go to Kampala, Uganda, and make a presentation on the S3Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesusto the priests of the Kampala Archdiocese. It was the second time in four mon...

Read More >

We all know Jesus told us to “love your neighbor as yourself.” So it shouldn’t be too much to expect Christians to respect everyone they meet. But St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, realized that respect is more than just a matter of the heart. That’s why he instructed his followers not only to respect others, but to show respect for them. “Preserve yourself in peace and true humility of soul, keeping silence when silence should be kept and, when you must speak, speaking with discretion,” he advised. “May your peace and humility show in the modesty of your counte...

Read More >

  People who take the time to gratefully reflect on their lives just once a year on Thanksgiving Day are cheating themselves — and scientists are proving it. One of those scientists — but by no means the only one — is Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D, who is author of Thanks! How Practicing Gratitude Can Make You Happier (published earlier in hardcover with the title Thanks! How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier). His research has shown that the old adage, "Count your blessings," is a really powerful prescription for a better life. "Preliminary findings suggest that thos...

Read More >

How to benefit from your failures

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Everyone has heard the story of how Thomas Edison regarded failure. Asked how he could keep pursuing invention of a successful light bulb after he had failed again and again, he replied: "I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work." If attitude counts for anything, his attitude about failure is a good one to have. He ended up having 1,093 patents to his name. Mindy Crary, writing in Forbes, offers seven keys for what she calls "successful failure." Reject rejection — Develop a healthy self-image not based on your performance. (Crary doesn't say...

Read More >

  Art Markman, a professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, executive editor of the journal Cognitive Science and a member of the editorial board of Cognitive Psychology, says: "Innovative ideas emerge when people are able to apply their knowledge to new problems." He offers five suggestions for how to lead better by leveraging your learning. Stop and organize. After a meeting, take a minute to review the three main things that came up. It will help you retain important matters much better. Give yourself permission to learn new things. Reserve quiet time at least o...

Read More >

  According to one of his secretaries, St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, had a four step process for making sound decisions. First, he carefully considered each matter before deciding it. He was not one to rush to judgment. Second, he prayed quite a bit about the decision and opened himself to the wisdom and will of God. Third, he made it a point in every decision to seek out those who were competent in the matter and to listen to them, asking them about the many different factors that might be weighed in the decision. Fourth, when he did not think he had sufficient knowledge to make a sou...

Read More >

7 simple ways to motivate others

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Some people argue that no one can motivate another person, but that claim is probably more a matter of semantics than substance. Anyone who can recall working harder for one teacher than others way back in grade school has some sense that one person's behavior can, in fact, inspire greater effort and achievement in others. Recently Vivian Giang, writing for Business Insider, recently suggested seven ways we can motivate others. 1. Introduce yourself on a personal basis. We think it's more accurate to urge leaders to "interact on a personal level," but Giang's point that first impr...

Read More >

  Writing in Decision Making, Leadership, Learning, Kevin Eikenberry says raises questions about when a leader should call a meeting to reach a decision. He distinguishes between four kinds of decision-making processes: Independent — the leader makes it alone, so no meeting is required — except, perhaps, to announce the decision. With input — the leader wants input before making the decision, so interaction is important and a meeting to discuss factors may be a good idea. Collaborative — the leader wants more than input, so interaction is crucial and a meeting is a good place for p...

Read More >

Sometimes less is more

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  According to a study conducted by Dr. K. Anders Ericcson and published in the Psychological Review, the key to great success is not plugging away 10 or 12 hours a day, but working harder in short bursts of time. Timothy Ferriss probably carried it to an extreme in his New York Times bestseller The 4-Hour Workweek, but 4-hour work days seem to be more productive for famous authors and excellent musicians. Shorter work days seem to play a crucial role when the level of concentration needed to be productive is high and projects require long periods of time to complete — such as writing a novel or learnin...

Read More >

Keeping first things first

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, wanted to keep life simple and properly focused for his followers. Thus, he advised them: "In every good choice ... our intention must be simple. I must consider only the end for which I am created — that is, for the praise of God our Lord and for the salvation of my soul: Hence, whatever I choose must help me to this end for which I am created." Of course, we have to remember that Ignatius did not see the salvation of one's soul as a solitary project. On the contrary, a person's role in salvation is to be open to God's grace in their lives &mda...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Institute Writing for Entrepreneur, Carol Tice identifies five types of bosses who drive people crazy — and also drive them out the door, creating a costly mix of high turnover and low productivity. Of course, the situation is hardly as toxic as the one depicted in the new movie Horrible Bosses, where three people set out to kill their bosses. But the movie has put the spotlight on that proverbial 800 pound gorilla in way too many organizations. Tice cites a recent survey of more than 400 workers that found 46% of them had worked for what they considered an &...

Read More >

  You may mean well but are distracted by other things. Or you may not even realize that you are not giving someone else your undivided attention. But your body language speaks volumes. And if it doesn't communicate that you're interested, you'll undermine the collaboration you probably want and certainly need to lead high performing teams. Here's how you can get your body to communicate that you really care about the communication you are having. Hiring: Get a better fit by asking better questions More and more we have come to realize how important it is to have good fits in the workplace. No...

Read More >

Learning and virtue both needed

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, had a message for his followers that is worth recalling in a time that often worships instant gratification and self-indulgence. He reassured his followers that when they took time to study and grow, they were still serving their neighbor because they were increasing their capacity to serve their neighbor. Some service simply cannot be provided without a certain level of expertise. So if people don't set aside time to develop that expertise, they will never be able to serve in the way God otherwise equipped them to serve. He also taught that preparing ones...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Institute In the last issue of The Catholic Leader, we offered eight tips for building trust in the workplace. The eighth one was "demonstrate competence." Under that rubric we wrote: "People with real expertise inspire trust and exercise influence whether they want to or not. Learn your craft. Master your craft. Then be willing to share what you know without "Lording over others." Becoming a master is not about showing off or feeding your ego; it's about serving your mission. If that's your inspiration, people will gravitate to you an...

Read More >

  People looking to stay on track as an S3 Leader will want to consider an ancient meditative practice called "Lectio divina." Don't let the Latin turn you off, says Trappist Brother Simeon Leiva. Brother Leiva, a Scripture scholar and monk at St. Joseph's Abbey in Spencer, MA, says it's an ideal way to unplug from worldly distractions and become more intimate with Jesus, according to a report from Catholic News Service. "Lectio divina" — "the reading of the sacred" or "the divine reading" — dates from the second century. It uses a pattern of rea...

Read More >

  St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, advised his followers to always listen carefully and critically before speaking — and to avoid flying off the handle in the course of discussions. He wrote: "Be slow to speak, and only after having first listened quietly, so that you may understand the meanings, leanings and desires of those who speak. You will thus know better when to speak and when to be silent." Notice that his focus is on understanding. It's easy enough to jump on people's words and phrases, trying to discredit them or their views, mocking them with sarcasm or distorti...

Read More >

  It’s easy to pile praise on others if they are the least bit competent. Generally, our biggest impediment is just being too busy to notice the praiseworthy behavior or, when we notice it, to stop and laud it. Criticism is another matter. Generally it’s difficult to criticize another — unless their behavior makes us angry. And it’s especially difficult to constructively criticize — where not only do we offer the criticism in a healthy, helpful spirit, but the other accepts it in that spirit and uses it to grow and improve their performance. Even when we mean well and can act fr...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Institute In all the material world, there is nothing quite like trust. It is the grease that lubricates relationships and makes effective human interaction possible. It is the glue that holds organizations of all sizes and purposes together. Generally speaking, the more trust there is among members of an organization — be it as small as a marriage or as large as a global enterprise — the more smoothly every process will work. And when things go wrong for whatever reason, as inevitably they will, the more quickly and better they will be fixed....

Read More >

Lent is a leadership season

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Institute When I was a kid, Lent was all about giving up things. Initially, I competed with my classmates to come up with the most awe-inspiring sacrifice. it was especially important to do better than the girls, who seemed to have more of a gift for such things. If someone gave up one thing, I would give up two. If someone gave up something really big and essential to a happy life — like candy — I would give up watching TV. If someone else gave up going to the movies, I would give up having any fun at all. It was a good formula for saintly perfection e...

Read More >

  A good bit of leadership today is exercised in the context of teams. There are, of course, the deliberate cross-functional teams so common in business settings. But even when our purposeful groups go by other names — families, parishes, service clubs or diocesan offices — the chief characteristic they share is that they are teams. When it comes to building effective teams that serve their mission, leaders have to consider the skills of team members and prospective members — or players, if you're comfortable with a sport metaphor that implies the importance of action, not just affiliation....

Read More >

  When we hear the word "charity," we often think of making a donation. That's appropriate — especially during Lent, when one of the three things we are to focus on is almsgiving. Charity also can be understood in a broader sense — as when we are generous with our time and talents as much as with our treasure. Going back to the word's Latin root, caritas, the concept points to the roots of our generous behavior — Christian love for everyone. St. Ignatius of Loyola recognized charity's deeper dimension when he taught that it has to begin with a disposition of the hear...

Read More >

  Although effective teams are generally small — no larger than a dozen and often smaller than that — there are nine roles that a prudent leader will try to cover in assembling his or her team, according to Stephen R.* Robbins. They are: Creator-innovator — initiates creative ideas; typically independent, prefers to work at own pace in own way. Explorer-Promoter — champions ideas after they've been initiated, finding resources needed to promote innovative ideas, but may not have the patience and control skills to follow through in detail. Assessor-Developer — strong analy...

Read More >

Today's world is full of people with ever shorter attention spans trying to respond to an ever growing volume of messages. We're expected to do more things with less help in less time — and all the while, be ever more responsive in an increasingly cluttered and complex communications environment. Multi-tasking isn't a virtue, it's a basic expectation — even though a lot of research shows that the more things we try to accomplish at once, the less we get done. (Could that be the real explanation for why our lives get busier and busier? Who has time to find out?) In any event, we plan to ...

Read More >

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, seemed to be anticipating the climate of America's political and social discourse when he put pen to hand in the 16th century and wrote: "In your dealings with all, be slow to speak and say little, especially with your equals or subordinates. Be ready to listen for long periods and until each has had his say. Answer the questions put to you, come to an end, and take your leave. If a rejoinder is offered, let your reply be as brief as possible, and take leave promptly and politely." While he would have starved as a radio or television news commentator today...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute A professor leading an orientation program for new doctoral students was trying to explain the concept of “systems.” She started with a question: “Is an airplane full of passengers a system?” From the back of the room came the response: “When it’s hijacked, it is.” Most of the students chuckled nervously, thinking someone had the audacity to be flippant. “That’s exactly right!” the teacher proclaimed. “Who said that?” When the student raised his...

Read More >

  We all know Jesus told us to “love your neighbor as yourself.” So it shouldn’t be too much to expect Christians to respect everyone they meet. But St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, realized that respect is more than just a matter of the heart. That’s why he instructed his followers not only to respect others, but to show respect for them. “Preserve yourself in peace and true humility of soul, keeping silence when silence should be kept and, when you must speak, speaking with discretion,” he advised. “May your peace and humility show in the modesty of y...

Read More >

  If you’re looking for a thin, light-hearted, easy to digest but helpful book on leadership, you won’t go wrong picking up a copy of The Leadership Secrets of Santa Claus: How to Get Big Things Done in Your Workshop All Year Long. At just 94 pages, it’s not hard to pack or to plow through if you happen to be traveling over the holidays. Purportedly written by Santa Claus, that is the nom de plume of Eric Harvey, David Cottrell and Al Lucis of Texas-based Walk the Talk Co. Using Santa’s voice, they briefly and clearly present several important leadership principles. Thus, you find chap...

Read More >

  Writing for the Financial Post, author and consultant Carol Kinsey Goman says increasing collaboration and building effective teams should be a concern for leaders because: it’s essential for organizational success today, and, the requisite “culture in which everyone pulls together can only come from the top.” “It's by winning your workers' trust, and making them feel valued and included, that you'll cultivate a real sense of teamwork,” she writes. "Today's most successful leaders guide their organizations not through command and control, but through...

Read More >

Micromanagers make lousy leaders

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  William Johnson has run H.J. Heinz, the $10 billion food company, since 1998 after coming up through the ranks overseeing various Heinz product lines. In an interview in Newsweek earlier this year, he indicated that micromanaging is not the way to lead people. But he admitted that it took him a while to learn how to be a top level executive. “My job is to lead the people and manage the process. It took me a couple of years to learn that, and [when I did] I stepped back from the operations ... and really began to focus on leadership — on having the right people in the right place, and on making s...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute Many of us in leadership roles believe we’re pretty good at what we do, we value our people, we are familiar with their wants and needs, and we go out of our way to meet them. Ironically, part of delivering on our leadership aspirations is recognizing that team members’ needs change and admitting upfront that we can’t always satisfy those needs. A case drawn from the life of a non-profit, church-based organization illustrates these realities. The 6-member team consisted of people with diverse backgrounds...

Read More >

After the Jesuits in Coimbra, Portugal, had established many vibrant apostolates, St. Ignatius had a concern. He was afraid their success would lead to complacency. If that happened, all their hard work and graces would ultimately accomplish nothing. He wrote to them in a tone that makes it seem as if they were on the brink of disaster — no doubt because he thought their successes were leading them in that direction. “For the love of God, do not be careless or tepid. For if tautness breaks the bow, idleness breaks the soul,” he cautioned. “Try to maintain a holy and discreet ardor in work a...

Read More >

  Tis the season when our thoughts turn to blessings and the importance of generosity. Two holidays this month — National Philanthropy Day and Thanksgiving Day — help focus our attention. But preparations for Christmas and end-of-the-year tax planning can also draw our gaze to matters of giving. National Philanthropy Day is observed Nov. 15 and this year Thanksgiving Day is Nov. 25, by which time the Christmas shopping season will be in full swing. In the midst of the seasonal rush, many people who itemize their taxes will also be looking to notch out a little time to make sure their donations to ...

Read More >

  When it comes to delegating and growing good people, a leader is always faced with a delicate balancing act. One the one hand, if you don't give people some opportunities to take responsibility, they will never grow — and the best and brightest will leave you to find more fertile places to grow. On the other hand, if you give them more responsibility than they're prepared to handle, you are setting them up for failure — and that can have long term effects on their confidence and your trust. What's a leader to do? In The Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesus, we say that ef...

Read More >

  Near the end of a Catholic Leading Like Jesus Encounter, participants view a short video about a Catholic Charities program in New Orleans that takes young people out of incarceration and off the streets and helps their put their lives on track. Eventually, they learn how to make a living in the hospitality industry. Called Café Reconcile, to date it has graduated more than 500 youths ages 16-22 from its 9-week program of basic life skills, interpersonal skills and work skills. Although the video, produced by the U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops, does not use the term "leading like Jesus," the ...

Read More >

Generosity key to productivity

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Most of us are frantically conscious of how we have to hoard time. After all, how else are we going to get anything done? St. Ignatius advised his charges to take another approach. "In business matters, be generous with your time; that is, if you can, do today what you promise for tomorrow." Lest you think these are the other-worldly ruminations of some mystical idealist, recall that Ignatius led a very busy life — and directed the Society of Jesus, which he founded, to include legions of men with a huge influence in the world before he died. Certainly he had to spend his limited amount of time and en...

Read More >

  Peter Block’s quote above puts us of a mind to mention a basic principle of the Lead Like Jesus Movement and S3 Leadership: Effective leadership begins on the inside. Ken Blanchard and Phil Hodges, founders of the Lead Like Jesus Movement, made that point very early in their book Lead Like Jesus: Lessons from the Greatest Leadership Role Model of All Time [LINK to Amazon w/our code]. It’s critical, they added, that every leader answers two questions: Whose am I? Who am I? Most of us think the second question is the most important one in life. But Blanchard and Hodges insist that the fi...

Read More >

  How to Win Friends and Influence People is the title of a best-selling back by Dale Carnegie published way back in 1937. But St. Ignatius of Loyola was addressing that same subject centuries ago. And all the talk today about “customer-centered” enterprises would not have been alien to the founder of the Jesuits. When the pope sent Jesuits on diplomatic missions, Ignatius advised them: “In dealing with people of position or influence, if you are to win their affection for the greater glory of God our Lord, look first to their disposition and accommodate yourselves to them.” He even of...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute At various times in our lives, we’ve all suffered the slings and arrows of difficult change. Maybe a move forced us to change schools and reluctantly leave dear friends behind. Maybe it was heading off to college. Love notwithstanding, maybe it involved adjusting to life with a spouse. Maybe it was the arrival of a new baby. In each case, the change opened us up to new adventures and growth. In many cases, the change was one we actually chose to make. But whether we chose the change or it imposed itself on us, we ca...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute In a fascinating Harvard Business Review blog post, Bill Taylor, co-founder of Fast Company magazine, says the key to high performing organizations is recognizing that culture matters. And in an organizational culture, love matters most. Taylor quotes famous business guru Peter Drucker, who once said: "Culture eats strategy for breakfast." A sound strategy is fine — even necessary. But leaders need to build cultures that support strategy implementation. Without a sound underlying organizational culture, s...

Read More >

  Father Antonio Brandao, a Portuguese Jesuit, once submitted a list of 15 questions about the spiritual life to St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits. The sixth question asked what method of meditation was the best. Ignatius replied by recommending the constant practice of seeking the presence of God. Here's what he said: "(People) should practice the seeking of God's presence in all things, in their conversations, their walks, in all that they see, taste, hear, understand, in all their actions, since His Divine Majesty is truly in all things by His presence, power, and essence. This ki...

Read More >

A new book appeared this month which offers the first extensive empirical data regarding the role of servant leadership in creating and sustaining vibrant parishes. Servant Leadership Models for Your Parish by Dan R. Ebener, Ph.D., reports on two studies conducted in the Diocese of Davenport (IA), where Ebener works part-time as the diocese's Director of Stewardship and Parish Planning and holds a full-time position in leadership studies at St. Ambrose University. The studies included: A Parish Life Study, which included a series of objective measures of all of the diocese's 84 parishes undertaken in 2005-...

Read More >

St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, knew what "overload" meant. Recognizing that it's easy for us to get so wrapped up in what we're doing that we forget why we're doing it, here's what he told his followers in the Constitutions of the Society of Jesus: "Make diligent efforts to keep your intentions right in all particular details. Always aim at serving and pleasing the Divine Goodness for its own sake and because of the incomparable love and benefits which God has [given] us, rather than for fear of punishments or hope of rewards, although you ought to draw help also from thes...

Read More >

  Every organization likes to think of itself as effective and innovative, but you don't have to be the latest reincarnation of Einstein to realize that's not true very often. Especially when it comes to being innovative, virtually all organizations could do better — and most could do a lot better. The problem is that innovation has to be fostered, but more often than not it's actually discouraged. Research on the topic points to several reasons for this. A few include: The value of becoming a "learning organization" focused on constant innovation is a relatively new discovery ...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute In the last issue of The Catholic Leader, we discussed some of the problems that arise in compliance cultures — where leadership sends the message that the chief expectation of followers is that they do only what they are told to do. This past month a friend sent us a book that outlines more problems in organizations that rely on compliance to achieve their objectives. Dr. Thomas Gordon, author of Leader Effectiveness Training but probably better known for his Parent Effectiveness Training book and programs, says the i...

Read More >

Work can be a prayer

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Some things never change. Writing 500 years ago, St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, acknowledged that his followers often had difficulty finding time to pray. Although he insisted on the importance of making some time for prayer, he also offered another suggestion: Make your work your prayer. He advised people that if they maintained a desire for prayer while they worked, their work became a prayer because, ultimately, all that they were doing was to serve God. St. Paul offered similar advice when he wrote: "Whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do everything for the glory of God." ...

Read More >

Higher goals, better striving

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Writing 500 years ago, St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, had some timely advice for us on the threshold of a new year and a new decade in a still new century. He insisted that just as any goal can motivate us, the higher goal of serving God should motivate Christians much more than baser motives like money and fame motivate other people. “Do not ever permit the children of this world to show greater care and solicitude for the things of time than you show for those of eternity. It should bring a blush to your cheek to see them run to death more unhesitatingly than you to life,” he admonished hi...

Read More >

By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute Many leaders think their primary task is to get people to do what they want them to do. In a word, their goal is compliance. Compliance has its place. In every aspect of life, there are some things that must be done and some that can’t be done. The sooner people learn what these are and comply, the better and happier everyone will be. But compliance can’t be either the workplace focus or the basis of the leader-follower relationship.  We’ve all heard the phrase before, “Just do what you are told.&rdquo...

Read More >

By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic Leadership Institute When it comes to the popular notion that highly-effective leaders are charismatic figures, I've got good news and better news for you. First, the good news. It's not true that people who have what passes for charisma in our society — good looks and an outgoing personality — make any better leaders than the rest of us. At least that's good news for the vast majority of us who are never confused with Hollywood starlets or box office idols and who might finish second in a personality contest with Ben Stein. Now for the be...

Read More >

  Leaders need to know themselves — their focus and their bias. And to be effective they have to transcend these natural tendencies. That's the word from Gill Corkindale, an executive coach and writer based in London. He says that leaders tend to be either "In Leaders" or "Out Leaders." The former tend to focus on what's happening within their own area of operations. The latter tend to gaze beyond their own area of operations to the behavior of whole organization and what's happening in the external environment. This bias can be the result of natural personality traits, a...

Read More >

God will not be outdone in generosity. For the sake of our salvation, He gave His only Son. God holds nothing back. To imitate Him, we must give as He gives. Aware of God's generosity, St. Ignatius taught his followers this prayer: Teach us, good Lord, to serve you as you deserve, to give and not count the cost, to fight and not heed the wounds, to toil and not to seek for rest, to labor and not ask for any reward except that of knowing that we do your will. How might I serve God and my neighbor more generously in the days ahead? What can I do today to better know God's will and to conform to it today? ...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute In The Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesus, we describe how a true servant leader recognizes that each human being is unique, and if we want to contribute to a person's development, we have to build a relationship with them that is intimate enough to illuminate their uniqueness. Here's a true story that illustrates the value of intimacy in leadership. The young man — let's call him Rick — was an editor of one of the weekly newspapers in a group our company had purchased. His paper was located in a ...

Read More >

We need to use the gifts God gave us It's clear that Jesus sets the bar very high when he speaks of our potential. At one point he tells his disciples: "Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect." (Mt 5:48) At another point he tells them: "Whoever believes in me will do the works that I do, and will do greater ones than these. (Jn 14:12) So he expects us to be as perfect as God, Himself — and to do ever greater works than he did while he was on earth? Isn't that setting the bar too high? No, he doesn't expect that from us. But he is reminding us that life ...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute The new football season is a great time to consider the question: What difference does leadership make? Considering the number of multimillion dollar contracts being awarded to college and professional coaches alike, some of America's most successful academicians and entrepreneurs obviously think it makes a huge difference. And they're right — it does! — even if they're not always very skilled at picking the best coaches to lead their teams to victory. If you follow football, you're sure to see...

Read More >

  Brian Vogrinc in Rockford, IL, and Randy Hain in Roswell, GA, have three things in common. Both are Catholic laymen. Both are professionals in the executive search business. And both are using their professional skills in their parishes to assist people who are unemployed. Randy, managing partner of Bell Oaks Executive Search in Roswell, near Atlanta, is a frequent contributor to a variety of Catholic publications seeking to integrate the laity's work and faith. Brian, president and partner at Vogrinc & Short, was a recent guest on a radio program hosted by Dr. Owen Phelps, Director of the Yeshua Insti...

Read More >

One thing hasn't changed since the 1500s when St. Ignatius of Loyola impressed upon his young students the urgency of their mission. He said the world needs them because Christian witness was all too rare in the world. He wrote: "If you recognize this obligation and wish to employ yourselves in promoting God's honor, the times you are living in make it incumbent indeed on you to make your desires known by works." Today we might say: "It's important that we walk our talk." Things to think about: If I wish my life to glorify God, I must make that desire known by works. What can I d...

Read More >

  We knew a man once who confessed that he didn’t like being a parent. We asked him why. He said it always made him feel like a failure. We asked him for specifics. “Because my kids never do anything the first time I tell them to,” he said of his four children, all under 10 years of age. He contrasted his role as a parent with his role as a high school vocational arts teacher. “Sure, some of the students like to goof around, and none of them listen all the time. But when I tell them to get started on something, most of them do it. At home, I’ll say something and the kids just ignore...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute [LINK: www.YeshuaLeader.com] Recall Douglas McGregor’s classic distinction between the assumptions of Theory X and Theory Y leaders: Theory X Leaders assume that people are generally lazy, don’t want to assume responsibility, want to do the minimum possible and thus they require constant prodding and supervision. Theory Y Leaders assume that people generally want to perform well and to contribute, even if they initially don’t have the skills to do so, and that if their skills are nurtured, they will gr...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute Two dramatic illustrations of selfless leadership have commanded front page headlines in recent months. We’re talking about the examples of U.S. Airways Captain Chesley (Sully) Sullenberger and Captain Richard Phillips of the U.S.-flagged merchant ship Maersk Alabama. We don’t know if either is an example of someone consciously trying to lead like Jesus. But it’s clear that the actions of both men point to the incredible power of leading selflessly — as Jesus did and said his disciples should do too. ...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute A reader who has worked in Catholic ministry for more than 25 years recently wrote: “For your next issue of The Catholic Leader, would you consider doing a follow-up to the article ‘The Role of Humility in Fostering Effective Listening and Leadership Skills’? I’d like to see how you would analyze the pope’s recent letter about the Society of St Pius concerns.” The reader also said he was impressed that Pope Benedict “listened to what was being said both internally and externally,&rdq...

Read More >

  10 Prayer Pointers for busy people From Sister Mary Ann Walsh USCCB Dept. of Communications Long moments when you’re put on hold or stuck in traffic might be God-given moments for prayer.  That’s what Sheila Garcia, wife, mother, commuter and associate director at the U.S. Bishops’ Secretariat for Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth, says in “Ten Pointers for Family Prayer.” Here’s a quick summary of her 10 tips: 1. Pray as you can, not as you can’t. Lay people can become discouraged when they try to pray like a cloistered contemplative. Be realist...

Read More >

  In a recent edition of Leadership Excellence, Mark Murphy, chairman and CEO of Leadership IQ and co-author of Leading on the Edge of Chaos, reports on a study of that came up with five top reasons why CEOs get fired. We don’t have to be CEOs to benefit from his conclusions, which we present here with out own comments. 1. Mismanaging change — Some organizations wait for their external environments to change them or force them to change. Other organizations are more proactive about planning to change before they’re forced to do it. Either way, once the change is underway, CEOs are expected to e...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute Perhaps it seems insane to be talking about hiring now when the headlines are monopolized by reports of layoffs, plant closings and corporate bankruptcies. But when the economy picks up and people are hiring again, they will be too busy to reflect on how they can build a more collaborative working environment. Now is the time to think about and prepare to do things better when the opportunity arises. That means the importance of collaboration in the workplace has to be considered more than ever before. As expected levels ...

Read More >

  Joseph Scordato is a Senior Project Engineer and Six Sigma Master Pilot at Taylor Company, a division of Carrier Commercial Refrigeration, Inc in Rockton, IL. He and his wife, Maureen, have 5 children. Their family is active at St. Peter Church and School in South Beloit, IL. Both Joseph and his wife are Secular Franciscans and enjoy serving engaged couples in marriage preparation at Bishop Lane Retreat House. Joseph completed his MBA studies through Cardinal Stritch University's College of Business in December 2007. He is currently an adjunct instructor for his alma mater. This article is based on a paper he...

Read More >

  By Phil Hodges Co-founder of the Lead Like Jesus movement “My brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of any kind, consider it nothing but joy, because you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance.” James 1:2-3 (NRSV) "All news is good news in Jesus Christ." Charlie “Tremendous” Jones Surviving tough times is both a worthy and necessary objective. But it is only part of the story. Here is a starter list on how and why tough times can be a blessing in disguise for which we can give thanks. Tough times can be a blessing if — We take less for...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director Tough times present servant leaders with a host of challenges — but also with a unique opportunity to serve their followers and organizations. To borrow a phrase from Rita McGrath, writing for Harvard Business Publishing, effective leaders “absorb some of the uncertainty” that weighs on those around them. Whether the pressure falls on your organization or on your associates personally, the effect is the same: “When people are facing uncertainty, they tend to go into ‘frozen in the headlights’ mode,” McGrath notes. That’s when ef...

Read More >

TAKING CARE OF YOUR BEST PEOPLE

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Writing in TIME magazine (Feb. 16, 2009), Nancy Gibbs looks at some interesting data to discuss the hidden costs of layoffs and the importance of keeping your best people especially close to you when there’s no option to “downsizing.” At a time when “75,000 jobs turn to powder in a day,” work environments fill up with uncertainty and people undergo an intriguing psychological change. Gibbs explains: “As all our emotions are rewired, we are grateful for what we once just assumed and frightened of things once ignored.” At the same time, “when people are frightened ...

Read More >

  By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute After surveying tens of thousands of working people around the world, two Harvard researchers say that leaders need to have vision — but not just any kind of vision. Pope John Paul II made the same point in his 1981 encyclical, Laborem exercens. Let’s look first at what the pope had to say and then turn our attention to the research. ... the person who works desires not only due remuneration for his work; he also wishes that, within the production process, provision be made for him to be able to know that in h...

Read More >

  A convert comes out of a spiritual wilderness to share 16 tips about faith, family and work that can help us all be Christ’s light to the world By Randy Hain About the author: Randy Hain is Managing Partner of an executive search in Atlanta, GA. Randy has been married for over 14 years and has two sons. He and his wife converted to the Catholicism in 2006. He is active in several parish ministries and leads the St. Peter Chanel Business Association and St. Peter Chanel Jobs Ministry. He is also leads the Woodstock Business Conference’s Atlanta chapter and is active in Eucharistic Adoration. He w...

Read More >

  When it comes to finding, hiring and retaining people today, flexibility seems to be a key asset — sometimes even more important than money. It’s true on both ends of the age spectrum: Many healthy and vigorous seniors nearing retirement age are looking for reduced-time, seasonal and otherwise flexible work schedules so that they have more time for families, travel and other interests they have deferred during their working years. Younger people just entering the workforce are looking for flexible schedules so that they can balance work obligations with other interests and relationships, typic...

Read More >

  What do small businesses, non-profits and church employers have in common? If nothing else, it’s providing competitive compensation packages for the people they need on their teams. That’s why a recent study by Deloitte Consulting LLP offers some good news for all three sectors. The study, “Competing for Talent,” discovered that while 71% of responding employers are relying on financial incentives to attract and keep people, money isn’t the most important consideration for Generation Y members now entering the workforce. What Gen Y workers — those currently 20 to 27 &mdas...

Read More >

PEOPLE KEY FACTOR IN GROWTH

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Some things never change. Although the technology sector of the economy is the place where you’d expect amazing digital devices to hold a place of prominence in growth strategies, the heads of high tech organizations say the key to growth is good people. A recent study by Deloitte Consulting LLP asked CEOs in the high tech sector to list the most important factors in achieving growth. First by a huge margin was “high-quality employees” (67%), followed by “strong leadership” (44%). Having a sound strategy finished third (37%), and having an “exceptional or unique product(s) lagged back...

Read More >

Each team in each moment is unique. No two teams are alike. No two moments in one team’s history are identical. And yet there are universal patterns that shape the dynamics of all group processes — even if the group is as small as a married couple. David Marcum and Steven Smith, authors of the new book Egonomics, report that John Gottman, a psychologist at the University of Washington, “can predict with 91% accuracy if a couple will stay married or divorce after watching and listening to them for as little as five minutes.” They say his work is “by far the highest prediction rate for a scie...

Read More >

WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FACING PRIESTS IN PARISH MINISTRY

Read More >

Special thanks to EWTN for conducting this interview and giving us permission to use it. Part 1 Part 2

Read More >

UNIQUENESS IS NOT EQUALITY

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Some leaders fear that servant leadership means letting prisoners run the prison, letting students run the school, or even letting patients run the asylum. That’s not how servant leadership works. True servant leadership — the kind modeled by Jesus — incorporates two dimensions: vision and implementation. Vision is a leader’s first responsibility. Others can be consulted, and often that’s a good idea because it brings greater buy-in from team members. But this task cannot be delegated. Leaders are, first and foremost, providers of and keepers of the vision. (Think back to wh...

Read More >

  Since St. Paul sat down with pen in hand to serve as the first Catholic journalist, we Christians have been told to think of ourselves as a body — the body of Christ. Paul refers to Christians as Christ’s body in many places, but his two most complete reflections are found in: 1 Corinthians 12:24-13:13 Romans 12:4-21 More recently, organizational gurus have been urging leaders to think of all organizations as organisms rather than mechanisms — in effect, as bodies. That’s a huge paradigm shift for many people. After a century of incredible technological development, we’r...

Read More >

  Our culture’s obsession with becoming rich and famous is really getting out of hand. That’s apparent from a recent story in Time magazine that reported on people who are paying to be chased around by paparazzi and given a copy of a fake fan magazine with their photo on the cover. Can you believe it? Wannabes are paying for something that is, in fact, the greatest scourge of those who are really famous. Prices range from $249 for three paparazzi who hassle you for a half hour to $1,499 for six paparazzi who pursue you relentlessly for two hours while a “publicist” tells them to stop both...

Read More >

SOMETIMES IT IS BRAIN SURGERY!

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  One of our most basic principles is that organizations are organisms, not mechanisms, and as such require diversity and feedback to sustain life and achieve their purpose. A primary responsibility of effective leaders, then, is to create and sustain the kind of environment where diversity and feedback can flourish. A review of operations at a prestigious hospital illustrates this point wonderfully — if tragically — and tells us that sometimes it really is brain surgery! At Rhode Island Hospital, which an Associated Press story described as “the state’s most prestigious medical center...

Read More >

SOMETIMES IT IS BRAIN SURGERY!

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  One of our most basic principles is that organizations are organisms, not mechanisms, and as such require diversity and feedback to sustain life and achieve their purpose. A primary responsibility of effective leaders, then, is to create and sustain the kind of environment where diversity and feedback can flourish. A review of operations at a prestigious hospital illustrates this point wonderfully — if tragically — and tells us that sometimes it really is brain surgery! At Rhode Island Hospital, which an Associated Press story described as “the state’s most prestigious medical center...

Read More >

  Some people say that no one can motivate anyone else. At some level that may be true. But for practical purposes these people are just playing a game of semantics. The fact is that we can influence others — and if we do that in such a way that they are moved to do something they were not moved or were less moved to do before, it is accurate to say that we have motivated the other person. We can do it. Often we are expected to do it. And effective leaders are doing it all the time. Since no two people are alike and, therefore, cannot be optimally motivated in exactly the same way using exactly the same en...

Read More >

  A meta-analysis of nine studies involving 1,739 workers found a significant positive relationship between motivation and job satisfaction. A happy worker isn’t always a productive worker (see above), but the knowledge worker who has low job satisfaction finds it difficult to be productive. Many factors go into job satisfaction, but a major issue is the quality of supervision provided. It is not common for a person to experience high job satisfaction if the relationship with his or her supervisor is not a satisfying one. A major reason cited for high turnover is the quality of supervisors — and w...

Read More >

  Some people confuse motivation with performance or productivity. They assume that if motivation is high, people will perform at a high level and productivity will be high, too. It’s not that simple. It’s possible to have a highly motivated person — or entire staff — that does not perform well or is not very productive. Motivation is an important component in high performance, highly productive operations because to perform at a high level, it is generally helpful to have people on board who want to excel. But motivation by itself is not enough because the desire to achieve, all by...

Read More >

MOTIVATION: THREE LEVELS

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  In the C3 Management Framework, we outline three levels of interaction between managers and subordinates, each with its own approach to motivation — and its own impact on organizational performance. Over the course of human history, management has tended to move from compliance (C1) to cooperation (C2) to contribution (C3). Each has advantages and disadvantages. But there are important reasons why this movement has occurred. Copyright © 2007 Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute, 208 E. North St., Durand, IL 61024. Any part of this newsletter may be reproduced so long as there i...

Read More >

MOTIVATION: THREE DEFINITIONS

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Our word motivation comes from the Latin word movere, which means to move. Obviously, we can move ourselves and we can move others — so a complete discussion of motivation involves both of those dimensions. Our focus here is on motivating others. But in the course of examining the dynamics of motivation from that perspective, you are likely to pick up some insights regarding motivating yourself. Usually one definition of anything is sufficient. But with something as complex as motivation, a few definitions are helpful. Each of these definitions has something unique to contribute to our understanding. ...

Read More >

  “... strive for the greater gifts. And I will show you a still more excellent way. If I speak in the tongues of mortals and of angels, but do not have love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.” (1 Cor 12:31-13:1) More than anything, motivating is a matter of intimacy. The more you know and the more you care about someone, the better you will do motivating them. That explains why the most successful organization in history is the family. No other organization or type of organization has come anywhere close to making the family’s contribution to the development of people — measured...

Read More >

At some point, each of us has to ask: What am I here for? As a rule, we ask that question several times in our life -- sometimes about particular situations, sometimes about the larger issue of life itself. Although you won't find this answer in any Catholic catechism, apparently for many of us the answer is: "To make as much money as I can possibly get." How else do you explain the rise in top executive compensation even while the buying power of most workers is eroding? Especially, how do you explain paying CEOs huge salaries and bigger bonuses even when the earnings and the stock values of the compan...

Read More >

THE SOURCES OF POWER — A QUIZ

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  Leaders have five potential bases of power: Reward power — ability to give others rewards in return for supportive behavior. Coercive power — ability to threaten and administer punishment. Legitimate power — formal position within an organization that confers authority. Expert power — knowledge or information that is valuable in achieving desired ends. Referent power — also known as charisma; one accords this power to his or her role models. These five bases of power share three sources: The first three of these power bases originate outside the personal re...

Read More >

DID YOU KNOW?

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

  The word “inspired” comes from the root spirare — which means to breathe.  In + spirare means to breath into. When we inspire others to greater development and higher performance, we are breathing new life into them. Copyright © 2006 Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute, 208 E. North St., Durand, IL 61024. Any part of this newsletter may be reproduced so long as there is full attribution, our web site is listed, and any electronic reproduction includes a link to our site: http://www.yeshualeader.com.

Read More >

How not to lead anyone

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Since Lent is a time of penance, I thought it a good time to approach the topic of Jesus-like Leadership by talking a bit about to be an ineffective leader. My inspiration comes from two places: The 77 Habits of Highly Ineffective People, a hilarious but out-of-print parody of a wonderful book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey. A blog by Gary Cokins called Rules for Assuring Poor Performance. To get the flavor of The 77 Habits of Highly Ineffective People, of which you can find used copies on Amazon.com, let me share with you the first suggestion of authors Jim Becker, Andy Mayer and Ba...

Read More >

Americans celebrate the birthday of George Washington this Friday, Feb. 22, and it's a good time to reflect on how graces emerge and spread far and wide when leaders have a humble heart. Of course, Jesus is the best leadership model and teacher of all time. No one compares to him. But Washington set as fine an example as we are likely to ever see in a political leader. The blessings of his leadership remain with us to this day, and so his example is worth recalling and celebrating. We all know that as general and commander-in-chief, Washington led the U.S. to independence in the Revolutionary War, presided over t...

Read More >

Stress is a silent killer -- of people certainly, but even more commonly of morale, productivity and quality performance. Stress is also ubiquitous in the work place. Last year's annual StressPulse (SM) survey by ComPsych Corporation, the world's largest provider of employee assistance programs, showed that more than two-thirds of employees own up to high stress levels, and almost a third confess to being so stressed they are unable to be effective at work on five or more days per year. Expressed in dollars and cents, workplace stress costs U.S. employers an estimated $200 billion per year in absenteeism, low...

Read More >

  Beginning this week you can use the Web to explore the implications of LifeBreath Leadership in your: home workplace church school MLI has developed a new partnership with Catholic Online, perhaps the most extensive independent Web site for Catholics in the world, to maintain a LifeBreath Leadership section. We hope you visit Catholic Onlinesoon and see what we have to offer there. You will also want to check outCatholic Online’s many other features and sections — all designed to serve busy Catholics who expect their faith to contribute to the quality of their lives.&...

Read More >

Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord.  (Romans 12:11 NRSV) Pope Benedict XVI dropped a bombshell this past Monday when he announced he would resign as pope at the end of February. Yes, there is precedent for it. But it hasn't happened in almost 600 years. By all accounts, the announcement surprised virtually everyone -- even many, perhaps all of his closest advisers. Here, in his own words, is what he told a group of cardinals who gathered for what they expected to be an ordinary public consistory to approve the canonization of new saints. "After having repeatedly examined my conscie...

Read More >

If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another's feet. (John 13:14 NRSV) Recently John Bossong, a father and manager of a truck sales company, wrote on a blog about the lesson he learned from his daughter's first paycheck: "My oldest daughter brought home her first paycheck last week. The household was celebrating uncontrollably. She's just 17, and this is her first 'real' paycheck. Why was I so impressed? It wasn't that she actually earned some money ... It's what was handwritten on the bottom of the check: 'Welcome to the team! Giv...

Read More >

  The Midwest Leadership Institute has developed a new metaphor to describe how effective leadership increases the performance and value of organizations: it’s a matter of breathing life into an organization. This metaphor is reflected in a new section of MLI’s web site called LifeBreath Leadership. LifeBreath Leadership flows out of a realization that every organization is a living organism — and that to think of organizations as mechanical realities, like a watch, obscures more than it reveals. Like any organism, an organization relies on various metabolic processes to maintain life a...

Read More >

Handling anxiety: some tips

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Anxiety weighs down the human heart,  but a good word cheers it up. - Proverbs 12:25 NRSV There's no doubt that a good word is powerful medicine. And clearly, it's most powerful when its dispensed regularly as preventive medicine rather than after anxiety sets in.  The One Minute Manager, co-authored by Lead Like Jesus' co-founder Ken Blachard, recommends that leaders dispense a regular supply of good words in the form of "One Minute Praisings." Nevertheless, anxiety is persistent in our personal and professional lives. A recent survey by ComPsych Corp, the world's largest pro...

Read More >

  Based on contemporary research, here’s what impact each of the four consultants’ approaches would have on productivity: The first consultant recommended that the organization redesign its jobs to be more complex, challenging and interesting. Research suggests that would probably increase productivity by 9 percent. The second consultant proposed a program of formal goal setting throughout the organization. Research indicates this course would probably increase productivity by 16 percent. The third consultant proposed launching a contingent payment program so that each employee was compensated...

Read More >

In the Lead Like Jesus movement, we talk about how fear is the natural fruit of EGO -- as in, Edging God Out. Pride is the other natural fruit of Edging God Out. Although at first glance these two things seem diametrically opposed, both are rooted in the perspective that the self is "Good Old Number One." When we put the self first, our prime value in life becomes looking out for oneself. That fosters ineffective leadership because when someone lives as if nothing matters more than his or her self, colleagues and associates -- even friends -- quickly learn that in these relationships they also have to look ...

Read More >

  When it comes to motivating people on a large scale, what does the research tell us about what works best? In their book Organizational Behavior: Securing Competitive Advantage, John A. Wagner III and John R. Hollenbeck, both from Michigan State University, answer that question with an interesting quiz. You are the leader of a large organization and you recognize that you need to improve the performance of your organization, but you are not sure about how to go about it. You decide to invite four consultants to look at your operation and suggest ways to improve it. Consultant 1 studies your organizati...

Read More >

  Yikes, January is more than half over -- already! Don't panic. There's still time to develop your list of New Year's resolutions. (And if you did that at the very start of 2013, there's still time to try keeping them all over again.) In either event, effective leaders know two things: To continue being effective, we have to lead out of a vision that is shaped by a mission or missions -- our own personal one, to be sure, and a collective one, as well, if we have a formal position in any type of organization. It is incredibly difficult for most people to stay on track with all the distrac...

Read More >

  Last August I was blessed to lead a retreat marking the start of the school year for faculty and staff at St. Theodore Guerin High School in Noblesville, IN. At the start of the program, we were all greeted by Father Joshua Janko, the school's Director for Catholic Mission, who asked everyone to take a little time to answer some questions that would provide them with spiritual goals for the new school year. As we begin a new calendar year, it struck me that Father Jenko's questions, organized around six markers, could serve as helpful navigation tools to get us all started off on the right foot in 2013...

Read More >

Jim Collins is all the rage in business circles. His Good to Great (date) explores the factors that make some companies stand out from the rest. What could be more important in a competitive economy?  His Built to Last (date) explores the elements that make a company’s success more enduring than that of the Pet Rock. Young people buy the former Stanford professor’s books either because they would like to go to work for a company that insulates them from ubiquitous downsizing or they want to launch a company that will survive beyond the angel financing stage. Now Collins has published a shor...

Read More >

Restore us, O Lord

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

"Restore us, O Lord God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved." (Psalm 80:4 NAB) As the Fourth Sunday of Advent arrives this weekend, on the eve of Christmas Eve, we share with you a petition in the Psalm that will be read at Masses: "Restore us, O Lord..." We won't hear that phrase in the Responsorial Psalm because our liturgy skips that verse. Meanwhile, our response to the verses that are included will be: "Lord, make us turn to you; let us see your face and we shall be saved."That's certainly a timely request as the celebration of our Savior's birth ne...

Read More >

'Tis the season to be generous

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Every valley shall be filled and every mountain and hill shall be made low. The winding roads shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.'" Luke 3:5-6 The sentences above come from the Gospel this coming Sunday, the second Sunday of Advent. They speak to us of promise, of hope. And, of course, the greatest hope of all -- the hope of a Savior -- is the hope fulfilled in our celebration of Christmas at the end of Advent. What can we, who aspire to be S3 Jesus-like Leaders, do now in Advent to prepare for the Savior's coming on Christmas Day? ...

Read More >

Rejoice in the Lord always

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:4-7 (NAB) The passage above from St. Paul's letter to Christians in Philippi is the second reading at Masses this weekend as we celebrate the Third Sunday in Advent. Regular readers know we don't usually make the readings at weekend Masses the t...

Read More >

The toll in the Enron fiction astounds: shareholders lost $60 billion, employees lost $2 billion in pension money, 5,600 people lost their jobs, founder Ken Lay was found guilty on six charges of fraud and conspiracy, former CEO Jeff Skilling found guilty of 13 such charges, and both were convicted of other charges having to do with stock sales and audits that exposes Lay to a sentence of up to 165 years in prison and Skilling up to 185 years behind bars. What went wrong? Whistleblower Sherron Watkins, writing in Time magazine (June 5, 2005, p. 35) says: “Unfortunately, in life, our strengths can become our weakne...

Read More >

The lines from Psalm 25 quoted above will be read in Mass this weekend when we celebrate the First Sunday in Advent. As the Psalm is read, four times we will respond, "To you, O Lord, I lift my soul." As someone who once had trouble distinguishing Advent from Lent -- I knew each of them came up once a year, one in the fall and the other in late winter or spring -- it's been quite a leap for me to see Advent as a real opportunity for my own leadership development. For the past several years, I have adopted the start of the church's new liturgical year -- which occurs this Sunday, the First Sunday in ...

Read More >

Drucker was one of the first organizational thinkers who took non-profit enterprises seriously — and recognized two things about them: Their impact on the nation’s quality of life is huge and growing; They need effective management at least as much as business enterprises do. As a result, his books are generally equally useful to leaders of both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations — and one classic is devoted to non-profits alone. Drucker wrote over 30 books, but here are a four you may especially wish to consider:   Managing in the Next Society (2002) Management Chall...

Read More >

As promised in the last issue, here are the seven common management assumptions that Peter Drucker said are outdated in the 21st century. “All of them have outlived their usefulness,” he wrote seven years ago. (Management Challenges for the 21st Century, 1999, p. 5). The first three obsolete assumptions underlie the discipline of management; the next four underlie the practice of management. 1. Management is Business Management. In fact, management’s focus is much broader than business because, Drucker writes, the “growth sectors in the 20th century in developed countries have been in “n...

Read More >

God invites us to a life of gratitude while the world fosters discontent. God proposes trust, the world arouses fear. God promotes giving, the world promotes getting. God invites us to cooperate with His providence while the world rallies behind self-determinism. God appoints us in stewardship while the world touts ownership. The world encourages entitlement when in reality everything is a gift from God. God invites us to look out for our neighbor, the world tells us to look out for ourselves. God operates from abundance, the world from a place of scarcity. God created us out of generosity to live generous lives, the world...

Read More >

We’ve all heard the old adages: “If you can’t say anything nice about a person, don’t say anything at all.” “It is better to be quiet and to let people think you might be ignorant than to speak up and confirm it.” We also know that sometimes we are so eager to impress or so fearful of silence that we almost can’t help blurting out something — almost anything — to fill the void. St. Ignatius of Loyola almost certainly would have advised you to adhere to the adages and let the silence happen if it must. In any event, he was a consistent critic of what he...

Read More >

It’s not unusual for leaders to be quick thinkers — people who are able to process information rapidly and respond creatively. That’s a good thing. But often such people are impatient with people who think and speak more slowly — and that’s a bad thing. If you finish people’s sentences or frequently interrupt them, you discourage their feedback ... and lose any benefits it can provide. Here’s a quick self-test to determine if this is something that should concern you: Do you sometimes find yourself losing track of details when people are speaking because you are thinking a...

Read More >

By Father Eugene Hemrick Director, National Institute for the Renewal of the Priesthood As I was leaving the National Gallery of Art on a clear, warm evening last fall, I did a double-take at the unending line that had formed in front of and around the U.S. Capitol. People literally were pouring onto the Capitol grounds from everywhere to pay their last respects to Rosa Parks, lying in state in the Capitol Rotunda.  … Above everything else, greatness stands for a person's willingness to stick up for what is important. Great people have great vision, make bold decisions, involve themselves deeply in eve...

Read More >

Until the mid-20th century, the management task through all of human history was compliance. Then, realizing that “you get more bees with honey than with vinegar,” management’s focus moved to cooperation. But now in the Age of Information, with what Peter Drucker called “knowledge workers” making up an ever larger part of the workforce, we see incredible leaps in organizational effectiveness when leaders foster contribution. That’s a quick look at our C3 Leadership Framework. We’ll be talking more about it and offering practical tips for how you can achieve C3 performance lev...

Read More >

Writing for SmartBlog on Leadership, Gretchen Rosswurm suggests eight ways to keep your people engaged in their work. By engagement she means "what employees or teams do to make everything go a little better for each other, their customers and their communities." In harmony with our own approach to leadership development, she advises that a leader's "behaviors are hugely influential," and how leaders interact with their teams "can build or break down engagement." Here are her eight suggestions: 1. Give your time because "the greatest gift leaders can give their em...

Read More >

Keeping first things first

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

What makes the Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesus unique is our focus on S3 Leadership -- servant, steward and shepherd. Many of you are familiar with these concepts. But no doubt some of your aren't. And all of us can use a reminder from time to time. So here's the 10-second "elevator speech" outline. S1, Servant - It's not about me. S2, Steward - It's not mine. S3, Shepherd - People are precious. Servant Leadership is not a new concept. The term dates to Robert Greenleaf's 1970 essay, The Servant as Leader.In that essay he wrote:  The servant...

Read More >

As a terrible, life-taking storm raged across the eastern half of the United States this week, it's a good bet that a lot of leaders were giving orders -- and a lot more followers were quickly responding to them. By their nature, emergencies are not resolved by a lot of process. In times of crisis, every healthy organization needs to know how to behave as an autocracy. Ordinarily, effective leaders are trying to plant and grow processes for effective decision-making throughout their organizations. But true emergencies call for extraordinary responses from leaders and followers alike. Perhaps the best example i...

Read More >

By Dr. Owen Phelps Director, Yeshua Institute “Go and preach the Gospel. And if you must, use words.”- St. Francis of Assisi to his followers One of the foundational principles of the Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesus is that “our actions speak louder than words.” In my book by the same name, we take up this issue almost immediately, noting that anyone who is known to be Christian participates in building the “Christian brand.” That may sound like modern business-speak, but actually it comes from the Third Century priest and theologian Tertullian, who noted that the behavior ...

Read More >

Evangelization - we can't opt out

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

There are a few things in life where we really don't have any choice. One is communications. We cannot choose to "not communicate" and think that's the end of our interaction with someone. When we shut up, people ascribe meaning to our silence. As my wife told me once, "You're giving me the silent treatment." And yes, I guess I was. Another is leadership. It's not a task that we can pick up or put down when we choose. Intentional leadership occurs whenever anyone influences anyone else. But unintentional leadership occurs all the time too -- and sometimes it is more power...

Read More >

Good leaders learn from their followers -- which is just one more reason why good leaders try to hire the very best people they can find and then give those people plenty of opportunities to continue learning. Michael Schrage, a research fellow at MIT Sloan School's Center for Digital Business and author of Serious Play tells the story of Sir Clive Woodward, coach of England's world champion rugby team several years ago. As part of their preparation, he bought each player a laptop computer and told them to become world-class IT users. Their specific assignment was to find new and better ways to improve...

Read More >

Today, Oct. 11, has double significance for Catholics.  We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the start of the Second Vatican Council. We mark the start of a Year of Faith declared by Pope Benedict XVI. As we said last week, it's a great time for us to commit ourselves to becoming more familiar with the core teachings and practices of the 2000-year-old church to which we belong. When the pope declared the Year of Faith last October, he said he hoped it would give "new impetus to the mission of the whole church to lead men out of the desert in which they often find themselves, to the place of li...

Read More >

On Oct. 11 we’ll celebrate the 50th anniversary of the start of the Second Vatican Council. It’s a great time for Catholics to commit themselves more to coming up to speed on the core teachings of the church to which we belong.  Many of us come to our posts as leaders – at home, at work, in our parishes and in the many roles we have in our communities — by crooked paths. Driving a car requires that one pass tests and get a license. Becoming a parent or a CEO happens in more fluid ways. Sometimes we are qualified, sometimes we are not. Nearly always, when it comes to fulfilling important lead...

Read More >

Recently I came across an article called The Seven Deadline Sins of Leadership by Mike Figliuolo. Of course I found the title provocative, so I checked it out and found lots of good food for thought. To see Figliuolo’s complete essay, click on the link above. A quick summary of it from yours truly follows. 1. Lust — Dress nice but don’t try to be too “sexy” or even charismatic. Appearances are obvious — but also pretty transparent. Instead on trying to exploit any of your physical attributes, rely on your behaviors and solid achievements to draw people to your team and ...

Read More >

  Writing in the American Express Open Forum, Katie Morell offers five leadership lessons from Dr. Martin Luther King: Don’t underestimate low-level employees Embrace fear Encourage creative tension Know the why Involve everyone For an explanation about what Dr. King meant by each of these, click here. http://www.openforum.com/articles/5-leadership-lessons-from-martin-luther-king-jr?extlink=em-openf-SBdaily Entrepreneurs share time management tips Recently five busy business owners who each own more than one business offered their personal time management tips. Among their suggestion...

Read More >

Culture — like communication and leadership — isn’t a choice. It’s inevitable. So when it comes to organizational culture, the only choice leaders have is what kind of a culture they will foster.  This is true whether we are talking about one’s home, workplace, parish or in any of the other communities of which we have a role. And its true whether we are the parent or child, CEO or custodian, parish council member or back pew Catholic. You don’t have to be an alpha leader to shape culture. You just have to adopt some principles and consistently live by them.  The corporat...

Read More >

Father Pedro de Ribadeneira, the secretary to St. Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, once recounted a story to illustrate just how selfless and flexible Ignatius was. He went to pay a visit to a former disciple who was very sick and depressed. At one point in the visit, he asked the man if there was anything he could do to bring happiness into his life and dispel the gloom and sadness he was experiencing. The man thought about it for quite a while and then replied with a request that seemed completely silly. “If you could sing a little and dance a little as they do in your country, in Vizcaya, I think thi...

Read More >

Last fall one of my granddaughters came home from her first day at preschool. She did not seem nearly as enthused at the end of the day as she had been when her mother dropped her off at the door.  “Did you like preschool?” her mother asked. “Not very much,” my granddaughter replied. “Did you make any new friends?” her mother asked. “No,” she replied very matter-of-factly. “Why not?” her mother probed. “Because nobody would do what I told them to do,” she explained. Her mother struggled to suppress a belly laugh while thinking to he...

Read More >

When talking to leaders in business and nonprofit organizations, we often find them skeptical that they can integrate their religious beliefs with their work roles.  Especially when it comes to leading like Jesus, they indicate that while imitating Jesus is certainly a praiseworthy ideal, it doesn’t strike them as a practical goal. Sure, they concede, Jesus is absolutely a nice guy — theperfect guy. But they add, often a little sheepishly, he never had to swim with the sharks. The rough and tumble of today’s world requires one to be assertive and self-focused just to survive. You know the ...

Read More >

No doubt there are some incredibly virtuous people who live pious, selfless lives of service that help and inspire virtually everyone they encounter and make the world a better place in which to live. Then there are the rest of us. We seem to need constant reminding that life’s highest purpose is not just to look after our own interests and its goal is not simply to “go for all the gusto we can get.”  We come into this world a bundle of needs — and we quickly learn, even before we are capable of conscious thought — to engage our world in meeting those needs. We cry, we kick, we scre...

Read More >

By Owen Phelps, Ph.D. Director, Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute A professor leading an orientation program for new doctoral students was trying to explain the concept of “systems.” She started with a question: “Is an airplane full of passengers a system?” From the back of the room came the response: “When it’s hijacked, it is.” Most of the students chuckled nervously, thinking someone had the audacity to be flippant. “That’s exactly right!” the teacher proclaimed. “Who said that?” When the student raised his hand, she as...

Read More >

Anyone at the consistory for new cardinals at the Vatican Nov. 20 who is remotely familiar with the work of the Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute might have thought they were attending a Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesus Encounter. That’s because Pope Benedict XVI selected as the Gospel for the prayer service St. Mark’s account of the disciples competing for a place of honor with Jesus. Jesus tells them: "Whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all." (Mk 10:43-44) Pope Benedict told the new cardina...

Read More >

“The leader’s style pulls ... (and) a pull style of influence works by attracting and energizing people to an exciting vision of the future. It motivates by identification, rather than through rewards and punishments.” - Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus  Leadership that pulls people with a powerful vision is more likely to build deep and last commitments than any system of rewards and punishments.  That’s something for every leader to keep in mind. But it can be especially crucial in the non-profit world where financial rewards can be few and far between. In such situations, leadership ...

Read More >

Gretchen Rosswurm, who has worked for several Fortune 500 firms and is currently Director of Global Corporate Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility at Celanese, a global chemical company in Dallas, says the outstanding leaders she has worked with share five “communication habits” that help the people around them perform more effectively. 1. They share an inspiring vision of the future. They “build a sense of shared purpose” and their visions answer several questions: Where are we going? What does it look like? What are the benefits? What role do I play in the success? They&rsquo...

Read More >

John Spence, author ofAwesomely Simple: Essential Business Strategies for Turning Ideas into Action, says that there are four problems that CEOs consistently identify as the biggest challenges holding back the performance of their organizations:   Lack of a vivid and extremely well-communicated vision; Lack of open, honest and courageous communication; Lack of accountability; Lack of disciplined execution. While Spence’s informal survey was limited to CEOs in the for-profit sector, my experience in the social sector indicates that these same challenges dog not-for-profit organizations too. ...

Read More >

At the eighth annual International Conference on Catholic Social Thought at the University of Dayton in June, Cardinal Peter Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, called on Catholic business schools to help students develop a moral compass. He also pointed leaders to a new booklet his pontifical council has published, available free on the internet, that should be of interest to people working in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. His point about the need for future leaders to develop moral compasses wasn’t to condemn people engaged in business enterprises. "Let m...

Read More >

The news came in an email from my brother Mike on Monday afternoon, July 16. Stephen Covey, 79, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, had died earlier in the day. The news left a little hole in my heart. I had never met Covey. But I felt I knew him from reading several of his books — and even more, from viewing several of his videos time and again as I presented his 7 Habits seminar. In fact, Covey’s books and seminars play large roles in the backstory of the Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute. More than a decade ago, Covey spoke to the U.S. bishops at their annual spring meet...

Read More >

In our Encounters, we often summarize the history of leadership in two minutes or less. In those 120 seconds, we break it down into four stages: C1: Compliance – This is how leaders generally led from the dawn of humanity until the 1920s. In a C1 leadership context, the primary task is to get people to do what you want them to do -- using any means possible. C2: Cooperation – In the first third of the 20th century, some people began to realize that compliance cultures were very expensive because people had to be watched all the time. They argued that if you devoted some resources up front g...

Read More >

Recently I was reading an article in which the author noted “few of us are natural-born leaders,” and so she offered five basic tips to help new leaders get on the right track – and stay there.  It struck me that not only were all of her tips sound, but they also affirmed our own perspective that when it comes to leadership, you can’t find a better teacher and role model than Jesus Christ. Addressing new leaders is timely because we get so many new leaders this time of year. Priests get new assignments to lead parishes, often for the first time. Principals are assigned to lead schools. Te...

Read More >

Engagement is often regarded as the silver bullet in individual and organizational performance, whether we are talking about families, small office teams, government staffs or international businesses.  If people aren’t engaged in what they are doing — whether it’s homework, building widgets, selling and servicing clients or negotiating world peace — performance suffers.  That’s why parents lay awake at night wondering how to get their teenagers to care more about the quality of their school work. That’s also why organizational leaders read books, scan the web, hold staff...

Read More >

When we talk about S3 Jesus-like Leadership, I often make the point that the very best examples of leadership I see are not in the corporate or nonprofit worlds, but in good families. The reason for that is easy to explain: parents generally love their children more than bosses love their employees. At the core of leading like Jesus is the choice we make between being a self-serving or God-serving leader. We know that Jesus is the perfect model of God-serving leader. After all, he gave up his life to do his Father’s will and save not only his followers, but all humans -- even those who rejected him. It is ...

Read More >

Popular leadership literature and a host of studies make the point that trust is an important consideration in effective leadership. Leaders who prove themselves trustworthy are much more effective in achieving their missions than are leaders who don’t inspire or who actually undermine trust in others. Trust is a unique thing in the material world because it has two seemingly opposite properties:  It is the grease that lubricates fast, clear, synergistic interaction between people, making cooperation possible; and  It is the glue that holds organizations together so that many people can work toge...

Read More >

Power to influence built on trust

Posted on July 13, 2015 in: Articles

When we think and speak of the power to lead, we often focus on what is known as “formal power” or “positional power.”  There’s no doubt that kind of power plays a defining role in many of our relationships, especially those at work. But it’s also true that among the various ways we can exercise power, “formal” or “positional” power is a weak one. And it’s growing weaker by the day in our culture, where we insist on the right to withhold respect and trust until the other person has demonstrated to us that they are worthy of such things -- no matter w...

Read More >

“The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between the two, the leader must become a servant and a debtor.”- Max DePree If that sounds like “soft-headed” thinking on the part of some head-in-the clouds theorist, think again. When Max DePree wrote that he was chairman and CEO of Herman Miller, Inc., the furniture maker that was named one of Fortune magazine’s 10 “best managed” and “most innovative” companies, and chosen one of the 100 best companies to work for in America.  It was also a good company to inve...

Read More >

Sunday we celebrate Pentecost — when the Holy Spirit descends on the apostles, beginning their public ministry and thus marking the beginning of the church. It is said to be the second most important day in the church liturgical calendar. And it is an especially important feast for all of those who hope to lead like Jesus in all of their relationships. Pentecost, you see, reminds us that in our endeavors to be Jesus-like S3 Leaders, we are not alone.  If you take your Christian leadership responsibilities seriously, this Sunday is a day to pay special attention to the readings. First, you will hear in...

Read More >

“The leader’s style pulls ... (and) a pull style of influence works by attracting and energizing people to an exciting vision of the future. It motivates by identification, rather than through rewards and punishments.” - Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus  In the non-profit world where financial rewards can be hard to find, leadership that motivates by identification is often the only practical option. That is to say, staff comes to deeply identify with the organization’s mission and vision. And make no mistake: It’s important, too, in for-profit organizations.  Of course, that r...

Read More >

This past Saturday my daughter Shannon sent me an email with a link to a story by Geoffrey James called 8 Core Beliefs of Extraordinary Bosses. So much of it resonated with the Catholic Vision for Leading Like Jesusthat I decided to use it in this newsletter.  On Sunday I awoke with the inspiration that I should relate the story about bosses to the Gospel passage where Jesus describes himself as “the good shepherd,” and then contrasts that role with that of a “hired man.” The good shepherd lays down his life for his sheep. The hired man, in contrast, abandons the sheep at the first sign...

Read More >

As we Catholics continue to celebrate the Easter season, we are excited about sharing with you a new service from the Yeshua Catholic International Leadership Institute.  It’s our new Weekly Catholic Leader. We plan to publish it every week — except when those weeks when we publish The Catholic Leader, our monthly flagship publication. Whereas our monthly Catholic Leader runs to several screens (or pages if you print it out) and includes several stories on a variety of topics, each issue of the Weekly Catholic Leaderwill deal with just a single story about a single topic &...

Read More >

The eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had ordered them. When they saw him, they worshiped, but they doubted. Then Jesus approached and said to them, "All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age." Matthew 28:16-20 A lot has been written about the importance of delegation – and it’s true in families as well as w...

Read More >